Wade Mainer, Uncle Vance and This Old Guitar

Wade Mainer

Wade Mainer died this week at the age of 104.  A mountain banjo player who came out of the mountains of Weaverville, NC, Wade and his brother J. E. were part of my life even though I never met either one of them.  They split up and had separate careers after 1936, and were a big part of the foundation of what Bill Monroe fused into “bluegrass” music.  Wade became the more famous of the two, playing the White House for President Franklin Roosevelt.

Uncle Vance Furr, my Daddy’s oldest brother, died at the age of 74.  He lived, all of the time I knew him, within several miles of the house where I first lived after I was born.  He and his brothers, including my Dad, were all carpenters and brickmasons, men of the earth and builders.  They worked with their hands.  Dad built that first house we lived in himself.

Uncle Vance lived on a main road, on a corner with a long drive going to his garage and shop.  If you turned and went on down the road, there were houses where moonshine could be had if they knew you.  Uncle Vance loved to fish and he loved music, among other things.  My brothers, Mike and Greg and I had nicknames he gave us–I was “Big Mully,” and Greg and Mike were “Middle Mully” and “Little Mully.”  I think that was short for “mullet,” as in the fish.  In those days, there were no mullet haircuts, and he didn’t mean we were stupid.  It was affectionate.  We were like three little fish.

Uncle Vance, right. J. E. Mainer playing the banjo in "The Mountaineers"

Vance, Dad and all the six brothers played music.  They lived near J. E. Mainer, who came to Concord to work in Cannon Textile Mill, so he could have a steadier living than music.  Vance played in a lot of bands around Concord, and played with J. E. Mainer some, according to Dad, including on the radio.  J. E. would come around and say, “Any you boys want to go to Charlotte with me and play?”  That was the music business then.

My cousin, Vance Jr., shared Uncle Vance’s old guitar, a 1949 Gibson J45, with my Dad so he can play it and enjoy it as the last surviving brother.  He played that guitar in a band he was in, “J. E. Mainer’s Mountaineers.”  We took it to Nashville to Cotton Music, where the fine craftsman there put it back into stellar shape again.  He insisted we leave the scratches on the guitar, where apparently the fellow he bought it from had his initials scratched onto the body and Vance scratched them off.  Those are hallowed marks, he said, you leave ‘em.

It smells good and looks good–a guitar with a lifetime etched into its scars.  They are meant to be played, banged, nicked and strummed and sung with.  Remembering is important.  Someone is alive as long as they are remembered.  The Bible says that God remembers us–and that means everything about us, good bad and ugly.  But that remembering is life.  As long as we are remembered,  inseparable from the love of God, we are still around.

Uncle Vance was never famous, never moved from where he lived during my life.  He never got elected to anything, so far as I know.  But he had a story.  Some of it I know–an early marriage that ended with an early and untimely death of his wife during childbirth.  Years of work and some hard-drinking and music and fishing.  A journey back to the Bible in his later years and, I surmise, peace with God.

And then there are stories I will never know–his thoughts during the journey of grief, coming through the Depression and World War II, sitting alone with his guitar and deedling.  It doesn’t matter.  Somehow when I hold this guitar, I know those stories and those notes are nearby.

Neil Young has a song called, “This Old Guitar.”  I love it.  The lyric says, in part,

This old guitar ain’t mine to keep
Just taking care of it now
It’s been around for years and years
Just waiting in its old case
It’s been up and down the country roads
It’s brought a tear and a smile
It’s seen its share of dreams and hopes
And never went ou
t of style
The more I play it, the better it sounds
It cries when I leave it alone
Silently it waits for me
Or someone else I suppose

This old guitar
This old guitar
This old guitar    (Listen to the song)

Old-time, folk, country, blues, bluegrass, jazz all share a reverence for the heritage that helped them be born.  Somebody had the guitar before you.  Somebody played those songs their own way and gave you some ideas.  Before you change it and make it your own, tip your hat and honor your ancestors.

About Gary Furr

Gary is a musician, writer and Christian minister living in Alabama.

Posted on September 15, 2011, in Art, Bluegrass, Country Music, Folk, Music, Old-time music and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Wade Mainer, Uncle Vance and This Old Guitar.

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