Category Archives: Blues

Death Grief and Hope: Songs for the Shadows

  We must face our losses.  Courage does not spare us from them. 

Courage’s work begins at the other end of honest acknowledgement.

          Grief can encompass many parts of life, not merely death.  It is, in many ways, our most universal experience.  It can be the death of dreams, grief of a way of life that ends, the end of a relationship, leaving home, moving to another town, divorce, a broken friendship.  The question is, “What are we to do with it?”

I can’t speak for people who have no faith in God, but I will admit that having faith in God doesn’t dispose of grief. It is just the same, just as overwhelming, the same disbelief followed by disintegration and despair and a long struggle to put life together again.

One verse of scripture I have found meaningful is  this one:

But we do not want you to be uninformed, brothers and sisters, about those who have died, so that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope.   1 Thess. 4:13

 I take great comfort that it does not say, “Don’t grieve, you’re a Christian,” but I have heard many a well-meaning minister stand up and talk about death like it was a flu shot. Death is real, it is irreversible, it is disheartening. I don’t think dismissing reality is a good idea. It has a way of showing up again with reinforcements.

The denial of death is, as Ernest Becker said, the most pervasive of human failings, and the most futile. The Apostle Paul said, very intentionally, that we should not “grieve as those who have no hope.” Instead, I would assume, we should grieve as people who DO have hope. Read the rest of this entry

Everything’s Bigger in Texas: the Oxford American 2014 Music Issue

OA Texas

The Oxford American Music Issue

For many years, a member of my church who knows my weird tastes in music (if most people have never heard about it, I might have; if mass media doesn’t write about, I will) gives me the annual Oxford American Southern Music Issue.  Given my roots and rootlessness around and on the edges of this bizarre and wonderful region (politics=absolutely bizarre; unelected people generally fascinating and gracious; land, music and layer of cultue—wonderful), he knows it lines up with my interests.

The OA is a journal with as colorful and eccentric history to match the region it writes about, but plenty has been written about it elsewhere.  Just a few lines to mention the music issue, which isn’t cheap ($12.95) but well worth it.  Every year, a particular state’s rich heritage of famous and not-so-well-known songwriters and performers are showcased.  Read the rest of this entry

Exploring the Discography of Life

“…there is a playful randomness about what we find and read.  Or rather, what finds us”

When I first rekindled my interest in songwriting and music again, sixteen or seventeen years ago, I began hanging out in music stores, playing the guitar again and digging out songs from my memory and on faded notebook paper from years ago.  One day, a worker in the store I frequent most, Fretted Instruments of Birminghm, said, “Are you just starting to explore the discography?”  I had just said that “I was getting into bluegrass music” and that was his reply.

I began to delve into just that—listening, going to shows, scooting to Nashville now and then.  I bought a collection of Bill Monroe’s music.  Over the coming years, I heard a lot of music live—Bruce Hornsby, Ricky Skaggs, Nickel Creek, J. D. Crowe, Earl Scruggs, Vince Gill, as well as a lot of lesser-known but excellent players and singers coming through the Station Inn in Nashville or here in Birmingham, Read the rest of this entry

Thou Shalt Love Thy Bandmates

Anyway, riding in a van for a week turned us from “Friends

and Brothers” to angry inmates who couldn’t wait to bust out.

Fifteen Years.  That’s how long Shades Mountain Air has been together, at least the core of Greg and Nancy Womble, Gary Furr, and Don Wendorf.  We have spent a couple hours a week most of that fifteen years weekly at Greg and Nancy’s house, practicing, horsing around, composing, arranging, learning and growing from one another.  We’ve only had one personnel change in all that time–Don’s son, Paul, our outstanding fiddle player, left us to move on with wife, kids, career, to Texas, and so, we were four again for a while, then found Melanie Rodgers.  Mel has added dynamic new joy to our sound, and is now a part of our 15th Anniversary Live Album that is now available.     (Go to the website store for our new CD click here!)

Image

Shades Mountain Air at Moonlight, 2013

The album sounds great!  We hired Fred Miller of Knodding Off Music to record and engineer our live concert.  Fred did a fantastic job and we are so happy with the result.  He captured our live sound and energy.  It sounds like us!  There is NOTHING like live music, and though it’s fun to be in a studio and monkey around with something until you get it “perfect”, there is a corresponding loss of that spark that performers-audience and a venue provide.  We did it at our favorite gig–Moonlight On the Mountain in Bluff Park in Hoover, Alabama, with Keith Harrelson, as always, handling lights and sound.

I say all this because Shades Mountain Air is more than a band.  We have become family together.  We love playing together, singing, creating, whether anyone is listening or not.  Greg and Nancy’s kids grew up having to hear us every week in their house. We have been through life crises, griefs, and changes Read the rest of this entry

Jim Hurst Can Play a Guitar

Jim Hurst picks.  He came dangerously close to Herb Trotman's "10,000 note limit"

Jim Hurst picks. He came dangerously close to Herb Trotman’s “10,000 note limit”

Last night, I went to hear JIM HURST, IBMA (International Bluegrass Music Association) Guitarist of the Year.  That means he is a fast-pickin’ guy.  “Bluegrass,” like few other labels, can lock you in.  The people who love and adore it who are more on the “traditional” side (Has to be like Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs played it or it ain’t bluegrass) will leave you for growing, experimenting and deviating.  The rest of the music listening world (Country, whatever that is anymore, sheesh!), folk, indie, etc. is disinterested because they never get beyond stereotypes like “Deliverance” and the Beverly Hillbillies. Read the rest of this entry

Love and Sorrow Mingled Down in Newtown: A Sermon Preached on the Third Sunday of Advent

A voice is heard in Ramah, weeping and great mourning,

Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted,

because they are no more.

Friday morning, I got up early.  I had a doctor’s appointment later, then a short appointment at the church and then the rest of the day I took off, as it was my normal day off.  I’m an early riser, and a lot of time I take time early in the morning and late at night to indulge myself in music, one of the places, along with my family, of deep joy for me.

Today is the Sunday of Joy in the Christian calendar

Greg Womble and I sat weeks ago and recorded a little improvised song with drum and banjo, a somber, modal-blues piece.  Friday I decided to finish it early in the morning, so I listened, feeling the mood and ideas that suggested themselves.  I heard bass and light guitar lines in it, so I recorded them, then sat back to listen.  The result was full, dark, somber, sad—perfect Christmas song.  What on earth should I name it, since there are no words?

A Bible text bubbled up that fit the mood.  I took the title, and sent a little email to Greg with the finished product.  And here is what I wrote:

“Greg:  I edited the song you and i did and added bass and light guitar.  The mood suggested a title for the piece:  “Weeping in Ramah”   CLICK TO LISTEN   from Matthew 3:18, after the slaughter of the innocents  What do you think?

 “A voice is heard in Ramah, weeping and great mourning,

Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted,

    because they are no more.”

 Then out into the day, doctor, a meeting at the church, then home.  Only then did I hear the terrible news about Newtown, Connecticut, a town not all so different from ours.  I had a weird feeling—I looked back at the email I sent, read online what time the events of Friday morning transpired.  The moment when the verse came to mind was the same moment the deranged young man began his short day of darkness.

I was struck by the weirdness of that juxtaposition.  Me, sitting in comfort and safety and boring routine, even Christmas shopping, and at that very moment, something unearthly, unimaginable. Read the rest of this entry

Banjo Harmonies

The truth is, the banjo, like all the indigenous music of the South,

is another of those curious shadowy meeting places of black and white people.

Surely by now you’ve seen that bumper sticker that says, PADDLE FASTER—I HEAR BANJOS PLAYING.  It’s an allusion to the worst movie for the banjo’s image since the minstrel era—“Deliverance.”  Despite the wonderful “Dueling Banjos” song, which was written by the talented Arthur Smith, whom I used to watch on TV from Charlotte, NC as a boy (and who also wrote the “Guitar Boogie.”), it was an image I’d as soon forget.

The banjo is associated with rednecks, hillbillies, and racism in the American mind.  We think of it as an instrument of uneducated mountaineers in the rural South.  We remember white people in blackface mimicking the music of the plantations that makes us wince in pain now.   And that’s too bad.  The banjo is an instrument that contains a shared history in black and white.  It is an African instrument that white people—especially the poor–came to love.

Unfortunately, the searing history of the plantation, slavery, with all of its terrible damage to the people brought here against their wills, left us with a bizarre and tragic legacy of contradictions that perhaps reflect in our music.  The notion that an African instrument, the banjo, would embody racism is odd indeed.  The truth is, the banjo, like all the indigenous music of the South, is another of those curious shadowy meeting places of black and white people.  From the painful memories of the minstrels to the accusations against Elvis as “race music,”  the musical inventions of southern culture—jazz, gospel, rock, soul, R&B, blues, country, folk and bluegrass—all formed bridges across a divide that was stupidly attempted by law and cultural taboo.

A couple of video explorations that will open up that world for you differently.  One is “Give Me the Banjo” NARRATED

Steve Martin is a lifelong devotee to the banjo

BY Steve Martin on PBS.  You can watch it online here CLICK  It is a wonderfully told narrative of the instrument through its  complex history and cultural settings.  It will introduce you to a lot of players you’ve never heard of, black and white, blues, old-time, folk, bluegrass and other styles.

Like so many cultural artistic expressions, you will find yourself realizing that all your surface shorthand stereotypes are nearly worthless.  Finding the worlds under the music is like the difference between taking a tour of a country and living there.

Picture http://www.jamati.com/online/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/bela-africa.jpg

Finally, I recently found Bela Fleck’s wonderful documentary, “Throw Down Your Heart.”  A camera crew follows the master banjo player and his sound man as they traipse through Africa to reintroduce the instrument to its home and play along with native folk musicians across the continent.  Movie reviewer Lou Novacheck wrote of it in 2009:

The main story covers their trip, beginning with Uganda in East Africa, and ending up in Mali in West Central Africa, and includes hundreds of African musicians from the countries they spent time in, Uganda, Tanzania, Senegal, Gambia and Mali, from the famous to unknown. I’m sure neither Fleck nor Paladino saw the complexities and immensity of the project ahead of time, and I’m equally certain that there will be at least one additional similar

Bela Fleck with new friends

trip in the future. The origin of the banjo and its concomitant history are subjects that music scholars have been chewing on for years.

Early in the ninety minute film there is an astounding clip of a group of men playing what is a gigantic “xylophone” made of small logs calibrated to different notes.  Fleck, the great jam musician he is, finds a place to play along.  The music is haunting, joyful, and you see as many smiles as any film ever has, genuine and pure.

Truth is, most music through time was not primarily entertainment as we have created it in the last century but participative.  Music was a way that common people found relief from the dreariness of life and connected in their sorrows, joys and hopes my sharing the gift of music.  The image for the banjo to me is not the “minstrel” or the sinister condescension of “Deliverance” at all.  Those terrible truths existed and still do.  But the image of the banjo is the jam, where people sit together and make music.  There is an etiquette to old-time and bluegrass jams about taking turns, learning a canon of tunes, being invited in, and initiating the newcomer.

This year I finally broke down an bought a banjo (to go with my guitars, acoustic and electric, mandolin, harmonicas, keyboard, violin, dobro, bass, two ukuleles and penny whistle, among other things.  I just love sounds—any and every.  I have a Gold Tone BG-250, a gorgeous instrument that prices at the beginning of the high end banjos.  I bought it from my good friend and banjo wizard, Herb Trotman, at Fretted Instruments of Homewood Alabama.

And playing it is not a political event to me at all.  It is simply soothing, a connection to ancestors and the mystery of all life.  When I sit alone and play, I am not alone.  I connect to the ages and to all things.  While I’m not very good yet, here is an MP3 I came up with as a first composition, called, “Dynamite Hill” with banjo and keyboard on my recording.    LISTEN TO GARY PLAY “DYNAMITE HILL”

In a time when people sit, docile, in front of Blueray screens and passively watch other people live life, the jam seems pretty healthy by comparison.  So I offer, in closing, a wonderful group from North Carolina, “The Carolina Chocolate Drops,” play “Cornbread and Butter Beans,” who keep alive that this music belongs to all of us.  In the weary, tiresome deadness of current politics and economics, we desperately need the arts to help us find our souls again.  A good jam is a great start.

Widow of Zarephath Blues

A few years ago, I wrote a song as part of a sermon series on the Blues.  I was inspired by a book by Stephen J. Nichols called, Getting the Blues: What Blues Music Teaches Us About Suffering and Salvation.  We had a great time in church—using drama of great blues figures like Bessie Smith, Blind Lemon, Muddy Waters, Mississippi John Hurt and others, and blues songs to illuminate a lot of Bible stories.

Oddly, to listen to the sanitized Suburbianity of today, you’d think religion was all panacea and no sorrow.  Nothing is more unbiblical than some of the nonsense that passes for Christianity, especially on the televised versions.  Getting the victory is more about American optimism than biblical reality.

If you read the Psalms and listen to the blues, you get some balance in your soul.  Throw in Job for good measure.  The blues are about turning pain into prayer.  One blues singer down in Mississippi said of his effort to teach the old blues to young boys, “I’m putting guitars in their hands instead of guns.”  You can debate guns, but no debate about killing—killing breeds more killing.  Despair leads to desperate things.

The blues is the choice to explore our pain rather than yield to it or collapse from it.  It turns pain into prayer.  One of the most familiar of all blues lines is a prayer found in the common Christian tradition in worship going all the way back to the first two centuries of Christianity, what the Catholics and Orthodox call the “Kyrie” for the word “Lord.”  “Lord, have mercy.”

Lord, have mercy.  You have to sing it right– Say it like this:  “LO-rd HAAAAVE MER-cy

So I tried my hand at a blues song. I wrote “Widow of Zarephath Blues.”  It was based on a simple little story in the Old Testament.

NRS 1 Kings 17:8 Then the word of the LORD came to him, saying, 9 “Go now to Zarephath, which belongs to Sidon, and live there; for I have commanded a widow there to feed you.” 10 So he set out and went to Zarephath. When he came to the gate of the town, a widow was there gathering sticks; he called to her and said, “Bring me a little water in a vessel, so that I may drink.” 11 As she was going to bring it, he called to her and said, “Bring me a morsel of bread in your hand.” 12 But she said, “As the LORD your God lives, I have nothing baked, only a handful of meal in a jar, and a little oil in a jug; I am now gathering a couple of sticks, so that I may go home and prepare it for myself and my son, that we may eat it, and die.” 13 Elijah said to her, “Do not be afraid; go and do as you have said; but first make me a little cake of it and bring it to me, and afterwards make something for yourself and your son. 14 For thus says the LORD the God of Israel: The jar of meal will not be emptied and the jug of oil will not fail until the day that the LORD sends rain on the earth.” 15 She went and did as Elijah said, so that she as well as he and her household ate for many days. 16 The jar of meal was not emptied, neither did the jug of oil fail, according to the word of the LORD that he spoke by Elijah.

Here is this widow, in Zarephath—foreigner in that time.  Elijah goes to her, because Israel is devastated by drought, but even worse, by spiritual compromise and failure.  Think about what she might be singing those words Elijah comes up to ask for something to eat.  So I tried my hand.  The song below is what I came up with.

She could have lived in North Carolina in 1931 or certain parts of any city.  Back in December our church helped a single Mom make her car payment.  She got evicted on December 23 with two kids.  That’s blues.

Since our politicians are arguing about the 1% and the middle class, and since nobody seems to have anything to say about poor people, evicted people, homeless folks and folks on hard times, I’ll send this song out to you.  Real faith is feeding your neighbor where there isn’t enough to go around.  Hope we get around to it eventually.  But until then, while they argue about spending money we borrowed before we made it, I’ll send this one out to the hard-times widows and their kin.

Click here to listen to“Widow of Zarephath Blues”

“Precious Lord,” Georgia Tom and the War with the Blues

Tonight our band is going to perform in one of the most prestigious gospel venues around our region—the American Gospel Quartet Convention, here in Birmingham.  Here many of the great African American gospel groups gather to sing, worship and honor fellow performers each year.  It’s meeting at the More Than Conquerors Church in Birmingham.  I like the names a lot of the independent churches give themselves.  It says something about “who we want to be.”  I heard about a midwestern church that actually named itself “Christ Memorial Church.”   What in the WORLD!  Ain’t you people heard about Easter???!!!!

Anyway, many of the greats of gospel have played here over the years—the Dixie Hummingbirds, the Blind Boys of Alabama, the Fairfield Four (remember the quartet singing in “O Brother Where Art Thou” when the boys are about to meet their maker at the end of a rope?)  Gospel and Blues have often conflicted with each other.  Some in the church even disapproved of the blues, feeling that it conflicted with the joy of the gospel.  I read once that the magnificent Mahalia Jackson, who died in 1972, refused to sing the blues.  “’Blues are the songs of despair,’ she declared. ‘Gospel songs are the songs of hope. When you sing gospel you have the feeling there is a cure for what’s wrong, but when you are through with the blues, you’ve got nothing to rest on.’”

Mahalia Jackson may be one of the greatest singers EVER.  Her rendition of the song of the day I posted today, “Precious Lord,” plays at the Lorraine Motel while you stand at the spot where Martin Luther King died, at least it did when I visited, and the tearful experience I had there inspired my song “Lorraine.”  I have to gently disagree, though.  The blues, they are Bible songs, too, if we read the Psalms right.  There is a whole section scholars call, “Psalms of Lament.”  Over sixty of the psalms are considered “laments,” mingling despair and hope as a prayer calling on God for help.  Somehow, to win victory by denial is a diminishment of the spiritual journey.

Still, the fork gospel music became offers a place of respite, joy, and at least a chance to voice the vision of victory.  Thomas Dorsey, the author of “Precious Lord,” embodied this contradiction and conflict between blues and gospel.  Son of a pastor, he rebelled against his raising early in life and went to Chicago in the early blues scene and gained some renown under the name “Georgia Tom,” but he struggled financially and spiritually.

“Precious Lord’ was born out of his own tragedy.  The preacher’s kid who had the foundation, whose parents prayed for him, who drifted away, into the nightclub world and secular success, then, two mental breakdowns, and finally, surrender to the gospel ministry and a long, long career at the famous Pilgrim Baptist Church in Chicago nevertheless suffered terribly.

In 1932, in the midst of his transition back into gospel for good, his wife Nettie died during childbirth, along with their firstborn, Thomas Andrew, Jr., who died the next day.  Thomas was away at a gospel meeting, and got the news.  Out of the anguish of that song came “Take My Hand, Precious Lord.”  It was the end of his blues singing for good, oddly enough.

His gospel greatness came out of that crucible of suffering.  There is no guarantee about life.  If the Bible is any guide, the blues will be the way to Gospel Joy.  They are different parts of the same journey.  I hope you’ll enjoy a listen to a version of Dorsey’s song I recorded with my bandmate, Nancy Womble of Shades Mountain Air.  We recorded it at my house, with me playing bass, guitar and mandolin and simply a lead vocal.  It is spare, recalling the hallowed, bluesy, holy crucible of Tom Dorsey’s suffering.  Ann Lamotte says there really are only two kinds of prayers:  “Thank you, thank you, thank you” and “help me, help me, help me.”  One is gospel, the other blues…

                                                         

Mary, Springsteen and Nietsche

 NRSV Luke 1:46 And Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, 47 and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, 48 for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; 49 for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. 50 His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. 51 He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. 52 He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; 53 he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. 54 He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, 55 according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.” 56 And Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

The first signs of the incarnation in the Christmas story is the moving of a child in a womb, a blessing before a birth, a declaration of faith, and a pregnant mother singing.  This is, for Christianity, the hope of the world.

Perhaps the greatest critic of Christianity in the last century was not anyone that most average people know, but his arguments lasted until this day.  The philosopher Nietsche attacked Christianity because of its adoration of humility and weakness.  It was, he said, “the transvaluation of all values,” by which he meant that Christians adore all the virtues that lead to the collapse of humanity.

Perhaps our failings, along with our founding faith, Judaism, was a God who felled the mighty.

Christianity, declared Nietzsche, is the vengeance the slaves have taken upon their masters. Driven by resentment, “a resentment experienced by creatures who, deprived as they are of the proper outlet of action, are forced to find their compensation in imaginary revenge,” they have transvalued the morality of the aristocrats and have turned sweet into bitter and bitter into sweet.

"The Annunciation" by Carravagio 1609

Who is right?  Mary or Nietsche?  Is it power and will and human pride or humility and the song of the outcasts?  Nietsche’s song is the song of children in competition:  “I’m better than you-ou, I’m better than you-ou.”  “Nanny, nanny, boo boo.”

Mary’s song bears some study for us.  We sing things that come from the deepest places in us.  Some people are ashamed to let their songs be heard, so they only sing them in their cars alone, or in the shower, but they sing.  To sing is to release our rational minds and come from our hearts and center.

The question is, “Which song?”

I got an interesting CD several years back entitled, “The Seeger Sessions.”  It’s a real turn for Springsteen—no rock and roll, acoustic, folk songs, and simple.  It was a humbling experience for him to sing, because that rock-n-roll voice don’t sound the same without that wall of sound-a-round.    It’s real, vulnerable, human, even though Bruce has a lot of instruments around him.  It’s an interesting and wonderful experiment.

One of the haunting song there is an old Spiritual that revived in the Civil Rights days called “O, Mary, Don’t You Weep, Don’t You Moan.”  It sounds very New Orleans early jazz-ragtime on Springsteen.  If you want the old full mass choir gospel version, catch Aretha Franklin and choir in 1972 on “Amazing Grace.”

The Seeger Sessions

The “Mary” in that song is actually Miriam, the sister of Moses, who witnessed the miracle of the Exodus on the shores of the Sea when Pharoah’s armies were pursuing the fleeing band of former slaves to kill them.  In a miraculous moment, the waters crash in upon the chariots and soldiers, vanquishing them.  It is the birth of the nation of Israel, their saving event.

The lesson of that moment was, “It is not you who creates the nation, but only God.  Never forget that you, too, were powerless slaves in Egypt, but God, the merciful, delivered you.”  Miriam sang, according to the book of Exodus:

 NRS Exodus 15:20-21  Then the prophet Miriam, Aaron’s sister, took a tambourine in her hand; and all the women went out after her with tambourines and with dancing.  And Miriam sang to them: “Sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously; horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.”

For over three thousand years, we’ve remembered that song, the pure joy of being saved when you thought it was all over.  They had no weapons, no strategy except their faith in a mysterious God who promised.

That song re-emerged in the sufferings of poor black people in slavery in this country, then in their Christian musical tradition.  One of my personal favorite versions is of blues singer Mississippi John Hurt singing in in his recordings in the 1920s.  Then it re-emnerged as a folk favorite in the 1960s, though Pete Seeger, but Mississippi John Hurt’s is my personal favorite.

That same song resonates with Hannah and with Mary.  It is the song of those who have nothing except God to count on.

Two women here—Elizabeth, who cannot have a child and God gives her one.  Mary isn’t ready for one, but God gives him to her anyway.  Mary is exultant not about something she wanted more than anything, but something she hadn’t even thought to wish for but God chose her to give the gift.

Mary’s song connects to the whole of scripture.  But deeply rooted here is a stirring truth—she sees the “turning upside down” of all values in the world.  The nobodies are somebodies to God.  The forgotten are remembered.  The lost are found.

Nietsche attacked Christianity for this very point as a “religion of weaklings.”  One might say that given the church’s track record, we haven’t always felt too strongly about it, either.  For we are constantly tempted to forsake the kingdom of Jesus for the seductions of Caesar.  If we remember to give to the poor we are mighty quick to put the rich on our budget committees and seat them at places of prominence.

Scholars increasingly have doubted that Mary composed this song.  Wouldn’t you know it?  One of the few women in the New Testament to author something and we’ve taken it away with scholarship!  One seminary professor has observed three profound truths about this song of Mary’s–

  1. We’ve “spiritualized” the Christian life, making it only about our feelings and emotions, but God is concerned for all of human life, including social justice and physical needs.
  2. We carry out his kingdom mission within a culture whose values are at odds with his values.  If the shadow people are God’s focus, how can we be Jesus in the world if they are not our focus?  Baptism is not a rite of passage but an initiation into discipleship and membership in a counter culture.
  3. True worship is a spiritual preparation and entry into the agenda of God for our lives and the priorities of God for our lives.

Of course, the question is, “Does this mean exchanging one group of people in control for another?”  And the answer is, “No.”  What we need is not the same game with different players, but something that is beyond what we currently know.  Walter Brueggemann has called it, “The Song of Impossibilty.”

But the beginning of any real change is in the imagination.  To believe that my life could be different, that I could live another way, that there is hope where I see none.

Reinhold Niebuhr, the famous Christian ethicist of last century, sought to answer Nietsche.  He said, “Yes, you are right.  Christianity DOES turn the values of the world on its head.”  Niebuhr wrote:

The Christian faith is centred in one who was born in a manger and who died upon the cross. This is really the source of the Christian transvaluation of all values. The Christian knows that the cross is the truth. In that standard he sees the ultimate success of what the world calls failure and the failure of what the world calls success. If the Christian should be, himself, a person who has gained success in the world and should have gained it by excellent qualities which the world is bound to honour, he will know nevertheless that these very qualities are particularly hazardous. He will not point a finger of scorn at the mighty, the noble and the wise; but he will look at his own life and detect the corruption of pride to which he has been tempted by his might and eminence and wisdom. If thus he counts all his worldly riches but loss he may be among the few who are chosen. The wise, the mighty and the noble are not necessarily lost because of their eminence. St. Paul merely declares with precise restraint that “not many are called.” Perhaps, like the rich, they may enter into the Kingdom of God through the needle’s eye.

I tell you this:  it is not in our power that we are ever greatest, but in our kindness and compassion.  Without these, we are reduced to the law of the jungle and the survival of the strongest.  A society that worships only power is a society that will one day devour itself.  Greed without stewardship becomes only self-absorption.  Eventually, there is nothing sufficient to satisfy us.  Power without service to others ultimately becomes what we have witnessed since Nietsche’s day—mass extermination and continuous war without peace and security that we continually fight to find.

We find ourselves still mired in the values of the old world.  We seek security by power and it eludes us even more.  We just officially ended the Iraq war, ten years and, conservatively, $709 billion, not to mention 4287 dead and over 30,000 wounded.

We have created entire television shows about people who collapse morally under the weight of success into drugs, addictions of various sorts and self-disaster.  The way of power is not a way that will bring happiness.   The way of power is not all that great when we see the damage left in its wake.

The church is not exempt from this way, either.  We have worshiped the Mary who sang this revolutionary song, but we have more often preferred the methods of the world it undermines—power, influence, wealth and prosperity.

If I have to choose this Christmas, I choose Mary’s way.  I realize that as I do that I, a prosperous American pastor living a privileged lifestyle in a comfortable place, immediately affirm values that undermine my way of life.  It is to choose a way that will never let me be completely at ease.

But the alternative is worse.  If I cannot immediately become one of the poor and forgotten of the world, I can let them into my heart as an act of my love for Jesus.  I can be “poor in spirit,” as Luke put it, and pursue the way of humility and self-forgetting and generosity to others.  I can follow the journey of surrender of my stubborn will and seek to obey the agenda of God in what I buy and how I live.

Mary’s song and Miriam’s song and Hannah’s song and the songs of the early Christians live on.  When we sing them, we sing hope—that our lives can be different, that we can prevail with God’s help over all that is worst in us, that we can persevere in the struggle with our own failings.  We might change the patterns of the past.  We might find healing and health.  We might make a difference in the world.

O Mary, don’t you weep, don’t you mourn
O Mary, don’t you weep, don’t you mourn
Pharaoh’s army got drowned

Mississippi John Hurt

O Mary, don’t you weep

Well if I could I surely would
Stand on the rock where Moses stood
Pharoah’s army got drownded
O Mary don’t you weep

One of these days about twelve o clock,

This old world’s going to reel and rock

Pharoah’s army got drownded
O Mary don’t you weep

When I get to heaven goin’ to sing and shout
Nobody there for turn me out

Pharaoh’s army got drowned

O Mary don’t you weep

Do we have any idea what we’re singing?

 SOURCES:

  •  Brown, Raymond E., “The Annunciation to Mary, the Visitation, and the Magnificat,” Worship, 1988.
  •  Burghardt, William, S.J., “Gospel Joy, Christian Joy,” The Living Pulpit, 1996.
  •  Lovette, Roger, “A Vision of Church,” The Living Pulpit, 2000.
  •  Martin, James P., “Luke 1:39-47, Expository Article,” Interpretation, 1982.
  •  Miller, Patrick D., “The Church’s First Theologian,” Theology Today, 1999.
  •   Taylor, Barbara Brown, “Surprised by Joy,” The Living Pulpit, 1996.
  •  Trible, Phyllis, “Meeting Mary through Luke,” The Living Pulpit, 2001.
  •  Wilhelm, Dawn Ottoni, “Blessed Are You,” Brethren Life and Thought, 2005. Poetry.