The State of the Union–of Love and Truth

Gary Furr

Love and truth belong together.  So why is it that they are so often found separated?  Moral life arises from the recognition of eternal truth, the acceptance of the reality of others in that same truth, and the sensitivity to feel the connection between them.  Puritan preacher Richard Baxter said love for one’s neighbor is akin to hunger and food connecting.  It makes possible a new and different conversation.

Truth and love cannot live divorced from one another.  Otherwise we are, in the former case, driven to principles rendered only as power, devoid of kindness and the graces and kindnesses of feeling for the other. Continue reading “The State of the Union–of Love and Truth”

Grandparents, Moneyball and the Call to Worry

See what I mean?

Watched “Moneyball” Sunday night.  I liked it.  It surprised me.  I wasn’t sure that it could be faithfully made into a film worth watching, but, as usual, I know little about the art of that.  Brad Pitt is a great actor, all of the fluff of paparrazinsanity aside, and he hit a homer again.  It’s an interesting story about baseball, change, and the resistance to new things that always comes.  It doesn’t end with exploding lights, a la, “The Natural,” but with the gentle irony that success leads Billy Bean to a fateful choice between one vision of “success” and family–even though his is broken.

I was in the mood to think about all of that, since my granddaughter just turned a year old this weekend.  She has changed our lives and our priorities.  I care much less about a great many things.  I declined an opportunity to be part of a panel on religious responses to immigration law in Alabama, a topic I feel strongly about, but I’m going to see that little girl for a brief visit, and, as I explained to friends, this is even more important than securing the borders of the United States.

Tony Giles, a friend who works in financial services, said yesterday that he is hopeful about the economy, even if worried, because, “Prosperity always climbs a wall of worry.”  His idea is that as long as we are worried about our world, there is still a chance it can get better.  I like that.  Jesus told us not to be anxious, which is one of the strangest and hardest of all of his sayings, for what else motivates humans beyond anxiety?  I know there is a way to not react to anxiety without eliminating it, and that is the best I can do.

Don’t worry about my granddaughter?  Might as well tell me to quit breathing.  I will worry about, at, and just plain worry this world until it provides her the kind of planet little children deserve.  If I had continued down midlife without her, I might have been able to unwind myself from caring a little more, retire, play golf and croak.  But I can’t.  It matters too much now.

Thing is, I don’t mind minding so much.  She’s worth it.  If a smile can make a person feel that good, you can cruise on it all day long.  The other day, our band, during practice, recorded “You Are My Sunshine” for my baby, recorded on an iPhone.  (click to play it). Grandparenting will make a fool out of you–I’ll testify.  One that will keep caring, no matter how bad they say it is.  God send us some more fools.  We might balance some budgets, stop a lot of stupid wars, work harder, save more, and give our egos a rest.  All you need is one baby.

 

 

When Nothing Else Can Help, Love Builds a House

One of the most-read blog pieces on here was one I did on the Hardy family of Williams, Alabama called, “Following Jesus from Israel to Rural Alabama.”  As a follow up to that, I am happy to report that last Sunday evening, the Hardy family received the keys to their new home in a dedication ceremony led by Pastor Mike Oliver.

Times of crisis can certainly reveal our failings and weaknesses.  But it is also true that crisis reveals character and new possibilities.  one of God’s most mysterious works is bringing communion and healing from our disasters.  Such times can divide, but they can also invite new re-formulations of Christian fellowship.  Ordinary divisions become an unaffordable luxury in the moment of need.  We come together and leave lesser things to God.

home again

John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist Church, was a man of broad spirit and reconciling heart.  He sought Christian cooperation in every way possible.  He once preached a sermon[1] on 2 Kings 10:15, which says, “When [Jehu] left there, he met Jehonadab

son of Rechab coming to meet him; he greeted him, and said to him, “Is your heart as true to mine as mine is to yours?” Jehonadab answered, “It is.” Jehu said, “If it is, give me your hand.” So he gave him his hand. Jehu took him up with him into the chariot.”

Wesley said “But although a difference in opinions or modes of worship may prevent an entire external union, yet need it prevent our union in affection? Though we cannot think alike, may we not love alike? May we not be of one heart, though we are not of one opinion? Without all doubt, we may. Herein all the children of God may unite, notwithstanding these smaller differences.”

In other words, unity of heart, spirit and love can exist even though we must have differences that will take longer to resolve.  We begin with this willingness to know a fellow Christian’s heart and build upon the possibility of fellowship.  It does not mean give up our convictions.  But we must begin with the hardest and highest call Jesus gave to us—to love one another as He loved us.  That is not what we do once we have worked out all our disagreements, our differences or

our hurts with one another.  Forgiveness itself is born out of obedience to the Savior’s call to love one another.

 



 

The keys

 

Thirty Days to Thanksgiving

Last Wednesday night I shared “thirty practices you can try in the next thirty days.” It was a reflection on Philippans 4:8-9:  “Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.  Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.”  In this time of so much turmoil and uncertainty, I don’t find most people losing their minds, killing strangers or giving up.  They are hunkered down, pulling together, depending on one another, and finding their own solutions to the times.  So I thought a series of sermons on “Simple Gifts: Thirty Days to Thanksgiving.”  The imspiration, grace and God-givenness of life cannot be conjured up, but we can surely put our attention on it, practice and implement them.  I thought it might help to have a simple action each day that we can try that can express, encourage and deepen our sense of gratitude. I hope you find something here that might help.

1. Express appreciation to someone important in your life verbally or with a note. Call or write an old friend and tell them what their friendship has meant in your life. Write your favorite teacher and express what their teaching meant to you. They never got paid what they were worth. Appreciation is about all they get.

2. Volunteer to help in a ministry to those less fortunate. It’s as easy as calling your church office, local service organization or other place of caring and signing up.

3. Choose to forgive someone who made you angry in the past and act toward them as though it never happened.

Sharing a little song

4. Sing with some other people, not just your ipod. Sing with a baby if you can.

5. Give until it hurts and then give some more until it quits hurting and becomes second nature. Get where you can see somebody else getting help and enjoy it.

6. Change the way you talk about your life. Make a list of the negative things you say most often. Can you turn them into positives instead? Reframe them into deeper truth?

7. Get to know one person you walk past, see every day, sit near in church, work with or see at the store or interact with regularly without ever having bothered to ask their name.

8. Create a behavioral set for your devotional life. Clear out a space or have one place for prayer time. Light a candle, or do the same thing every day to create readiness.

9. Carry your Bible to church as a physical reminder to yourself to read it daily. Memorize some verses. Encourage our children to bring it.

10. Read Psalm 4:8. When you go to bed tonight, pray this prayer. “Lord, I turn the world over to you. I have carried too much of it on my back and it was never mine anyway. Be with me in my dreams, my weariness, and my endless lists of things to do tomorrow. Now go to sleep.

11. Laugh, hard, at least once today and remind yourself that you are not the center of the universe. If you need a little help, go to the funny birthday card section at the drugstore, watch children playing together, or look at your high school yearbook picture.

12. Sit in silence and breathe calmly for ten minutes. That’s all. How was it?

13. Do something for someone you love that tells them you do.

14. Fast from the internet and television for 24 hours and give some of that time to loving someone in your life instead.

15. Put a short appointment on your calendar today and leave it fallow. Sit, even for 15 minutes, and absorb a spiritual truth, look at something beautiful, or pray.

16. Share time and attention with someone who is suffering, in trouble or who needs you. It will pull you out of yourself quickly.

17. Make a list of people who have been mentors, encouragers and who have blessed you. The length may surprise you.

18. Give money and pray for a missionary you know or for a country in the world as you do

19. Practice acceptance. Accept God’s acceptance of you—remind yourself that because of grace, you are free to forgive, free to love and free to welcome

20. Get reacquainted with your inner child—play, do something you’re not good at, draw, or roll on the floor with a baby if you know one. Give it a rest with the serious adult for a while.

21. Accept that God has given you spiritual gifts and start using them for the sake of the church. They have nothing to do with how other people see you and everything to do with what God wants to do through you.

22. Pray without ceasing by spending a whole day praying a verse or thinking about God. Just be there.

23. Make a list of your close calls and then think, “It could have gone really badly for me. I was given a second chance.” Now consider giving someone else a second chance.

24. Put a dollar in the mission offering of your Church for every complaint you make today about your life, the government, Congress, the schools, society, “those people” (whoever they are), your parents, your loved ones, or anyone else. At least you can help missionaries.

25. Read Philippians 4:6. When you start worrying about something today, turn it into a verbal prayer.

26. Try praying all the way through the church prayer list. You don’t have to know what their issue is. Someone was distressed enough to put it there.

27. Spend some time in nature and pay attention to its joyful truth to you.

28. Think back to when you were at your most difficult time. Did you learn anything as you went through it that could help you now?

29. Give out ten affirmations today. Don’t go to bed with one or two still in your mouth unoffered.

30. Spend a little time jotting down everything that touches your life today that took other people to get it to you—at work, your food, every part of your life. In your time of prayer, consider the complexities of God’s giving through others to you.